Best Lincoln Welding Helmet

Lincoln Electric of the most well-known welding companies around today and there is a good reason why. For over 100 years they've been providing people with high-quality welding equipment. Most people in high-paying welding jobs prefer Lincoln's Viking series helmets, including myself. To make things easier for you, we put together a review for the best Lincoln welding helmets so you can decide which would be best for you.

Lincoln Welding Helmet Reviews

  • Viewing Area: 12.5 sq. in.
  • 4 Arc Sensors
  • Switching Speed: 1/25,000 Seconds
  • Variable Shade #5-13
  • Weld/Grind Mode

The first Lincoln welding helmet we'll go over is the Viking 3350. This just happens to be Lincoln's most popular helmet and my personal favorite go-to helmet for important jobs. It may be on the pricier side but it's well worth every penny and will last you years.

What makes this helmet worth it to me is definitely the clarity and view. It has the biggest viewing area of any welding helmet I've used before (besides the 3250D FGS) measuring 12.5 sq. in. Then with the 4 arc sensors, variable shade #5-13, and a switching speed of 1/25,000 seconds, the improvements in my welds were phenomenal.

I was extremely impressed by how comfortable it was too. Featuring the state of the art X6 Headgear, the Viking 3350 can adjust comfortably to any position. It's easy to adjust, has a cushioned back pad, adjustable resting position, and a perfectly vertical position.

You can see why the Viking 3350 is Lincoln's most sought after welding helmet. Just to impress you, even more, the helmet includes LIncoln's famous 4C Lens Technology, weld and grind mode, and the long sought after perfect 1/1/1/1 optical clarity.

If you have the extra money, I'd highly suggest purchasing the Viking 3350. It's a great investment that provides you with years of clarity and protection.

  • 4C Lens Technology
  • Viewing Area: 12.5 sq. in.
  • Variable Shade: #5-13
  • Switching Speed: 1/25,000 seconds
  • 4 Arc Sensors
  • Shade 5 Side Windows

Now we get to talk about Lincoln's best welding helmet, the Viking 3250D FGS. I've seen this helmet referred to as the "Cadillac of welding helmets", which is a perfect way to describe it. Its a bit pricier and will cost you more money than the Viking 3350. Even though it costs more, you get all the best features a welding helmet can have in one product.

To start with, clarity and viewing size will easily beat your expectations. The viewing size is the same as the Viking 3350, which is 12.5 sq. in. Unlike the Viking 3350, the 3250D FGS features a wider view with two shade 5 windows. One feature I was surprised to see was the integrated clear grind shield with a 161-degree field of view. That with Lincoln's 4C Lens Technology and the 1/1/1/1 optical clarity, I could see my weld puddles clearly.

I did have one issue with the helmet though. It's definitely not a welding helmet I'd use for long jobs. After using it for an 8-9 hour shift, my neck was so strained. For these longer jobs, I'd definitely rather have the Viking 3350, but for shorter jobs, the Viking 3250D FGS reigns supreme.

  • 4C Lens Technology
  • 1/1/1/1 Optical Clarity
  • Viewing Area: 9.3 sq. in.
  • Variable Shade #5-13
  • 4 Arc Sensors

Next up on our list is the Viking 2450 welding helmet. I want to start out by saying this is probably my least favorite welding helmet from Lincoln Electric. Don't get me wrong though, the Viking 2450 is still a high-quality helmet with most of the same features as the Viking 3350.

With the 4C Lens Technology, 1/1/1/1 optical clarity, and 4 arc sensors you still get the great clarity and protection that you expect from Lincoln. Plus it even includes Lincoln's highly adjustable and comfortable X6 Headgear. It's even pretty lightweight, unlike the 3250D FGS, so neck strain isn't something you have to worry about.

Now the main reason I said this was my least favorite is that for basically the same price, you can get the Viking 3350. They essentially have the same features except for the viewing size of the Viking 2450 is smaller, coming in at 9.3 sq. in. So you can see why I'd just spend the money on a helmet with a bigger viewing area and the same features.

  • Viewing Area: 3.78" x 1.85"
  • 2 Arc Sensors
  • Variable Shade #9-13
  • Switching Speed 1/25,000 Seconds

You might be starting to wonder if Lincoln offers any budget-friendly helmets. Luckily they offer a few cheaper helmets that still have all the high-quality features you'd expect from an expensive one. The first one of these cheaper Lincoln welding helmets we'll go over is the Viking 1840.

The clarity and protection of the Viking 1840 welding helmet are amazing, especially for the price. With this helmet, you get a decently sized viewing area of 3.78" x 1.85". The wide viewing area, optical clarity 1/1/1/1 and variable shade #9-13 give you an extremely clear view while you weld. However since it is cheaper you do only get two arc sensors, which didn't make much of a difference to me.

When it comes to comfort, the Viking 1840 performs pretty well. Now it doesn't feature their X6 Headgear, so it's not nearly as adjustable as Lincoln's New helmets. This was only a minor issue for me though. Plus the helmet was pretty lightweight, so its good to use for long periods of time.

  • Viewing Area: 3.78" x 1.67"
  • 2 Arc Sensors
  • Variable Shade #9-13
  • Weld/Grind Mode

Last on our list of the best Lincoln welding helmets is the Viking 1740. It was one of the very first welding helmets in Lincoln's Viking Series, so it'll obviously have just the most basic features. This is also the cheapest of all the other helmets I've gone over, with the price coming in under $100. Even though its one of their oldest helmets, the Viking 1740 is still a great starter helmet and its perfect for those hobbyists who don't weld all the time.

The Viking 1740 has all the basic features you'd expect in a cheaper welding helmet. Some of these features include an average viewing area of 3.78" x 1.67" (slightly smaller than the Viking 1840), 2 arc sensors, and a 1/1/1/1 optical clarity. Sadly its the one helmet in the Viking series to not have LIncoln's infamous 4C Lens Technology. However, as a starter helmet, the clarity is still above average compared to other welding helmets in the same price range.

Even though the clarity is lacking, the comfort and weight of the helmet are on par with the other helmets in the Viking series. Not to mention the other features the Viking 1740 offers were pretty surprising for a welding helmet of this price. Some of these features include a weld/grind mode, auto on/off, and it even has sensitivity/delay control.

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